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Chicory ~ Cichorium intybus ~ How to Grow and Benefits

1280px-Cichorium_intybus-alvesgaspar1

Common chicory, Cichorium intybus,  is a somewhat woody, perennial herbaceous plant usually with bright blue flowers, rarely white orpink. Many varieties are cultivated for salad leaves, chicons (blanched buds), or for roots (var. sativum), which are baked, ground, and used as a coffee substitute and additive. It is also grown as a forage crop for livestock. It lives as a wild plant on roadsides in its native Europe, and in North America and Australia, where it has become widely naturalized.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicory

Wild Chicory or Succory is not uncommon in many parts of England and Ireland, though by no means a common plant in Scotland. It is more common on gravel or chalk, especially on the downs of the south-east coast, and in places where the soil is of a light and sandy nature, when it is freely to be found on waste land, open borders of fields and by the roadside, and is easily recognized by its tough, twig-like stems, along which are ranged large, bright blue flowers about the size and shape of the Dandelion. Sir Jas. E. Smith, founder of the Linnean Society, says of the tough stems: ‘From the earliest period of my recollection, when I can just remember tugging ineffectually with all my infant strength at the tough stalks of the wild Succory, on the chalky hills about Norwich….’

DescriptionIt is a perennial, with a tap root like the Dandelion. The stems are 2 to 3 feet high, the lateral branches numerous and spreading, given off at a very considerable angle from the central stem, so that the general effect of the plant, though spreading, is not rich and full, as the branches stretch out some distance in each direction and are but sparsely clothed with leaves of any considerable size. The general aspect of the plant is somewhat stiff and angular.

The lower leaves of the plant are large and spreading – thickly covered with hairs, something like the form of the Dandelion leaf, except that the numerous lateral segments or lobes are in general direction about at a right angle with the central stem, instead of pointing downwards, as in similar portions of the leaf of the Dandelion. The terminal lobe is larger and all the segments are coarsely toothed. The upper leaves are very much smaller and less divided, their bases clasping the stems.

The flowerheads are numerous, placed in the axils of the stem-leaves, generally in clusters of two or three. When fully expanded, the blooms are rather large and of a delicate tint of blue: the colour is said to specially appeal to the humble bee. They are in blossom from July to September. However sunny the day, by the early afternoon every bloom is closed, its petal-rays drawing together. Linnaeus used the Chicory as one of the flowers in his floral Clock at Upsala, because of its regularity in opening at 5 a.m. and closing at 10 a.m. in that latitude. Here it closes about noon and opens between 6 and 7 in the morning.

Read in Full Here @ A Modern Herbal ~ https://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/c/chicor61.html

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Chicory is a plant. Its roots and dried, above-ground parts are used to make medicine.

Chicory is used for loss of appetite, upset stomach, constipation, liver and gallbladder disorders, cancer, and rapid heartbeat.

It is also used as a “tonic,” to increase urine production, to protect the liver, and to balance the stimulant effect of coffee.

Some people apply a paste of chicory leaves directly to the skin for swelling and inflammation.

In foods, chicory leaves are often eaten like celery, and the roots and leaf buds are boiled and eaten. Chicory is also used as a cooking spice and to flavor foods and beverages. Coffee mixes often include ground chicory to enhance the richness of the coffee.

How does it work?

Chicory root has a mild laxative effect, increases bile from the gallbladder, and decreases swelling. Chicory is a rich source of beta-carotene.

Read in Full Here @ WebMD ~ http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-92-chicory.aspx?activeingredientid=92&activeingredientname=chicory

Information On How To Grow Chicory

chicory
Image by pawpaw67

By Bonnie L. Grant

Chicory plant (Cichorium intybus) is an herbaceous biennial that is not native to the United States but has made itself at home here. The plant can be found growing wild in many areas of the U.S and is used both for its leaves and its roots. Chicory herb plants are easy to grow in the garden as a cool season crop. Seeds and transplants are the primary means of growing chicory.

Read in Full Here ~ http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/herbs/chicory/growing-chicory.htm

How to Grow and the Benefits of growing Chicory from Wild Chicory Heirloom Seeds

 Read in Full Here ~ http://www.localharvest.org/blog/48630/entry/how_to_grow_and_the

Forage chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) is a perennial plant that is suited to well-drained or moderately drained soils with medium-to high-fertility levels and a pH of 5.5 or greater.

Read in Full Here Forage Chickory ~ http://extension.psu.edu/plants/crops/forages/species/forage-chicory

 


 


 


 


 

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5 responses

  1. I wish it was naturalised here in Tasmania. Alas, they only let useless weeds through for we Taswegians, none of this “useful” stuff for us!😉

    October 2, 2014 at 5:53 pm

    • am going to try and get some seeds here for you and Old Fart. i have never thought of getting seeds before as it is everywhere here and most people treat it as invasive. i think it is beautiful as roadside flower myself and i leave some in my yard as well🙂

      October 2, 2014 at 10:59 pm

      • I really love the colour of it. If you do manage to get some seeds, let me know. We can swap. I will send you some native pepperberry seeds to try growing your own Tasmanian pepperberry bush at your house🙂

        October 2, 2014 at 11:13 pm

      • thank you🙂 you got a deal!

        October 2, 2014 at 11:29 pm

      • 🙂

        October 3, 2014 at 6:27 am

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