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The garlic said to the onion, “You Stink” ~ Everything about Planting Garlic ~ Health Benefits

1280px-Italian_garlic_PDO

Allium sativum, commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion genus, Allium.

Its close relatives include the onion, shallot, leek, chive, and rakkyo. With a history of human use of over 7,000 years, garlic is native to central Asia, and has long been a staple in the Mediterranean region, as well as a frequent seasoning in Asia, Africa, and Europe. It was known to Ancient Egyptians, and has been used for both culinary and medicinal purposes.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garlic

 
1280px-Allium_sativum_003Botanical name: Allium sativum

Plant type: Vegetable

USDA Hardiness Zones: 345678

Sun exposure: Full Sun

Soil type: Loamy

Soil pH: Slightly Acidic to Neutral

Garlic is easy to grow and produces numerous bulbs after a long growing season. It is frost tolerant. Beyond its intense flavor and culinary uses, “the stinking rose” is good in the garden as an insect repellent and has been used for centuries as a home remedy.

Planting

  • Garlic can be planted in the spring as soon as the ground can be worked, but fall planting is recommended for most gardeners. Plant in the fall and you’ll find that your bulbs are bigger and more flavorful when you harvest the next summer.
  • In areas that get a hard frost, plant garlic 6 to 8 weeks before that frost. In southern areas, February or March is a better time to plant.
  • Break apart cloves from bulb a few days before planting, but keep the papery husk on each individual clove.
  • Plant cloves about one month before the ground freezes.
  • Do not plant cloves from the grocery store. They may be unsuited varieties for your area, and most are treated to make their shelf life longer, making them harder to grow. Instead, get cloves from a mail order seed company or a local nursery.
  • Ensure soil is well-drained with plenty of organic matter. Select a sunny spot.
  • Place cloves 4 inches apart and 2 inches deep, in their upright position (the wide root side facing down and pointed end facing up).
  • In the spring, as warmer temperatures come, shoots will emerge through the ground.

 

Care

  • Northern gardeners should mulch heavily with straw for overwintering.
  • Mulch should be removed in the spring after the threat of frost has passed. (Young shoots can’t survive in temps below 20°F on their own. Keep them under cover.)
  • Cut off any flower shoots that emerge in spring. These may decrease bulb size.
  • Weeds should not be a problem until the spring. Weed as needed.
  • Garlic requires adequate levels of nitrogen. Fertilize accordingly, especially if you see yellowing leaves.
  • Water every 3 to 5 days during bulbing (mid-May through June).
  • A note on garlic scapes: Some folks love cooking the scapes (the tops of hardneck garlic). Whether you trim the scapes or let them keep growing is your preference. We like to stir fry scapes the way we cook green beans—similar with a spicy kick!

 

Pests

Garlic has very few problems with pests in the garden (in fact, its a natural pest repellent!), and also very few problems with the diseases that plague other veggies. White Rot is one concern, but you should also keep an eye out for the same pests that plague onions.

  • White Rot is a fungus that may attack garlic in cool weather. Not much can be done to control or prevent that problem except rotating your crops and cleaning up the area after harvesting. The spores can live in the soil for many years. The fungus affects the base of the leaves and roots.

 

Harvest/Storage

  • Harvest time depends on when you plant, but the clue is to look for yellow tops. Harvest when the tops begin to yellow and fall over, before they are completely dry.
  • In Northern climates, harvesting will probably be in late July or August. In Southern climates, it will depend on your planting date.
  • Check the bulb size and wrapper quality; you don’t want the wrapper to disintegrate. Dig too early and the bulb will be immature. Discontinue watering.
  • To harvest, carefully lift the bulbs with a spade or garden fork. Pull the plants, carefully brush off the soil, and let them cure in an airy, shady spot for two weeks. We hang them upside down on a string in bunches of 4 to 6. Make sure all sides get good air ciculation.
  • The bulbs are cured and ready to store when the wrappers are dry and papery and the roots are dry. The root crown should be hard, and the cloves can be cracked apart easily.
  • Once the garlic bulbs are dry, you can store them. Remote any dirt and trim off any roots or leaves. Keep the wrappers on—but remote the dirtiest wrappers.
  • Garlic bulbs may be stored individually with the tops removed, or the dried tops may be braided together to make a garlic braid to hang in the kitchen or storage room.
  • Bulbs should be stored in a cool (40 degrees F), dark, dry place, and can be kept in the same way for several months. Don’t store in your basement if it’s moist!
  • The flavor will increase as the bulbs are dried.
  • If you plan on planting garlic again next season, save some of your largest, best-formed bulbs to plant again in the fall.

 

Recommended Varieties

There are three types of varieties of garlic: Softneck, Stiffneck, and Great-headed (Elephant). Most types are about 90 days to harvest.

  • Softneck varieties, like their name suggests, have necks that stay soft after harvest, and therefore are the types that you see braided. Especially recommended for those in warmer climes, as it is less winter-hardy than other types. Strong, intense flavor. Recommended varieties: ‘Persian Star’, ‘Mother of Pearl’
  • Stiffneck varieties grow one ring of cloves around a stem, there is not a layer of cloves as there are in softneck varieties. They are extremely cold hardy, but do not store as well or long as other varieties. Flavor is more mild than softnecks. Recommended Variety: ‘Carpathian’
  • Great-headed varieties are not recommended. They are less hardy, and more closely related to leeks than other varieties. Their flavor is more like onion than traditional garlic. Bulbs and cloves are large, with about 4 cloves to a bulb.

 

Recipes

Wit & Wisdom

A nickel will get you on the subway, but garlic will get you a seat.
–Yiddish proverb

Rub raw garlic on an insect bite to relieve the sting or itch.

http://www.almanac.com/plant/garlic

 
more here 

garlic

Garlic Planting Guide ~ Garlic in Containers @ Auntie’s Here  ;)

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Garlic is a wonderful and powerful savory addition. It jazzes up many recipes and also contains healing properties. Truly fresh garlic is pungent, white, hard and full of a juicy liquid.  I believe that much of the garlic that is sold in stores has gone past its peak (rubbery or soft) and has lost much of its medicinal value. One way to maintain not only its flavor but also its healing powers is to dry it and make it into garlic powder.
http://www.almanac.com/blog/celestes-garden/making-garlic-powder

 

Garlic_flower_head

Six reasons garlic is an amazing healing superfood

 
 
 
 

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/041476_garlic_superfood_natural_healing.html#ixzz2xy2Jf7e1

 

How to Deter Mosquitoes and Other Bugs

They’re here! With the early spring weather, a bumper crop of blood-thirsty black flies and mosquitoes have appeared, too! All insects have a purpose but some are awfully annoying to humans! Here’s how to deter mosquitoes and other bugswhile you enjoy the great outdoors.

We all know about store-brand products, so we’re going to tell you how to fend off those pesky insects with safe, non-toxic repellents.

http://www.almanac.com/content/how-deter-mosquitoes-and-other-bugs

lawngardens

5 responses

  1. Stinky old garlic is my favourite. We use it just about every day🙂 I also have a great clump of garlic chives that have just gone to seed that I am going to spread everywhere as well.

    April 5, 2014 at 7:20 am

    • i love it too🙂 of course lol … i hope my chives come back, i just had new clump and the neighbors water line broke and flooded my yard when we had subzero temps. worried about my newly planted perennials

      April 5, 2014 at 11:39 am

      • They are tough things perennials. Hopefully they survived it. Lucky it was now and not a few months ago where they would surely have frozen solid…fingers crossed!

        April 6, 2014 at 4:49 am

      • that’s the thing it was few months ago when we had sub zero temps. the water is still draining from my yard …

        April 6, 2014 at 10:52 am

      • OH dear😦 Fingers crossed. Pretty soon your garden will be hot and dry. Hardly fair that all of that water doesn’t space itself out evenly through the year. We have the same problem but not the freezing (at least not on Serendipity Farm)

        April 6, 2014 at 5:39 pm

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