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Coconuts are the ‘wonder food’ with a multitude of uses

coconuts

(NaturalNews) Coconuts are scientifically known as Cocos nucifera and they get the coco part of their name from Spanish explorers that thought they resembled monkey faces. The Coconut is extremely nutritious and on some islands it’s actually the biggest part of people’s diets.

Its content is quite rich in fiber and it represents an excellent source of vitamins and minerals, to the point that the coconut palm is actually viewed as the tree of life. Thankfully, its long list of health benefits that is passed on from a generation to another has now for the most part been validated by modern science.

The coconut is now used around the world to treat a vast spectrum of health conditions such as abscesses, asthma, baldness, bronchitis, bruises, burns, colds, constipation, cough, dropsy, dysentery, earache, fever, flu, gingivitis, gonorrhea, irregular or painful menstruation, jaundice, kidney stones, lice, malnutrition, nausea, rash, scabies, scurvy, skin infections, sore throat, swelling, syphilis, toothache, tuberculosis, tumors, typhoid, ulcers, upset stomach, weakness, and wounds.

Coconut oil should be regarded as a top choice to protect and help your skin

Skin tissues tend to harden and lose elasticity as we age therefore the end result is sagging and wrinkled skin. Free radicals which are directly involved in this destructive process, gain momentum and produce chain reactions when left free to roam around. Fortunately, it’s possible to somewhat halt and counter these devastating effects thanks to the much needed help of antioxidants. This is where coconut oil comes into the picture.

Dr. Ray Peat is a well regarded biochemist that has written about the antioxidant effects of coconut oil. He’s on record saying it’s a well established fact that coconut oil reduces our body’s need for vitamin E. He believes that coconut oil’s antioxidant properties play an important direct and indirect role. Virgin coconut oil is definitely one of the best to fight off free radicals, as it remains unrefined and filled with its essential antioxidant components.

Rubbing coconut oil on wrinkles and sagging skin can help rejuvenate it by strengthening the tissues. Applying the same method is also a great way to fight off skin problems such as psoriasis, dermatitis, and eczema.

One of the easiest signs to notice struggling and aging skin is the appearance of brown, freckle-like spots which are also referred to as liver spots. These spots are a clear sign that free radicals have accelerated the deterioration of the lipids in our skin, hence the name lipofuscin. The oxidation of polyunsaturated fats and protein is considered as the premier cause of aging spots. Since cells can’t get rid of this lipofuscin pigment, it essentially accumulates within various cells of the body as we get older. When the lipofuscin pigment develops, it generally stays around permanently but it’s certainly possible to prevent any added damages and probably even diminish the existing spots by regularly using cocnut oil on your skin.

Sources for this article include :

http://www.coconutresearchcenter.org

http://www.coconut-connections.com

http://wakeup-world.com

About the author:
After spending several years working in property management and being a web consultant for PS Communications, P. Simard is now on his way to becoming a naturopath in the province of Quebec. Always searching for the truth with an open mind, his innate passion for knowledge and overall health matters has finally led him to Natural News.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/041367_coconuts_coconut_oil_skin_care.html#ixzz2ooYONdNN

Coconutandflower

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9 responses

  1. Interesting…wish we could grow them here in Tasmania but until global warming really kicks in, I think we might just have to wait a while…

    December 29, 2013 at 4:32 pm

    • no chance here either and i love them, omg is little piece of heaven fresh yummy 🙂

      December 29, 2013 at 4:39 pm

      • I think there are a few producers up north on the mainland of Australia, but for a country where the entire top end is tropical you would think that we would attempt to grow more coconuts wouldn’t you?!!!

        December 29, 2013 at 4:59 pm

      • i sure would, be great source of cash flow besides food and home uses

        December 29, 2013 at 6:11 pm

      • Seems we Aussies might be a bit slow on the uptake, we have obviously had it a bit too easy for too long now! 😉

        December 29, 2013 at 9:05 pm

      • sounds familiar 😉

        December 29, 2013 at 11:04 pm

  2. can u grow them indoors ?

    January 4, 2014 at 1:56 am

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