kick your shoes off and come on in …

(A. Mangostanus) ..AMARANTHRUS – EDIBLE RED LEAF

Akka's Natures Way+living

AMARANTHRUSEDIBLE RED LEAF 

(A. Mangostanus) 

 

This Item Not on the Australian Nox Weeds list

 

Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket

 
 
Edible Amaranth grows very well in warm climates. This fast-growing vegetable can be harvested 30 days after sowing, by the cut-and-grow-again method. Seeds are very small and will germinate best at temperature above 65 F under dark conditions. Thin plants during the growth if necessary and thinnings can be eaten.

Edible young leaves and stems are cooked like spinach.

The amaranth family has many groups of plants found in various regions in the world.

Red is a unique amaranth variety with red leaves and deep red stems. Upright and tall type plants grow vigorously in hot weather, suitable for growing from late spring through early fall. Young leaves and stems can be harvested for cooking at any growing stage. Several cuttings can be obtained with the cut-and-grow-again…

View original post 13 more words

Advertisements

4 responses

  1. I love the possibilities of amaranthus, chia and quinoa, they all seem to be relatively easy to grow and spread like weeds BUT we have to get them to the stage where they can flower and seed before they can become weeds…we have a large native animal population that adores anything green and tender and a chook population that sees anything tender as their personal gullet contents. I am going to have to grow these plants under protection and to do that, we are going to have to erect another fence…at the moment we are still working on our big enclosed garden bed so anything else is going to have to wait till that is finished. I am going to use old wine bottles (we have a lot of them) to make a garden bed inside the area along with some of the large rocks that are dotted at irritatingly regular intervals through our silty clay based soil. All I know is that I AM going to grow these wonderful plants very soon.

    September 16, 2013 at 7:27 pm

    • Thanks for reading it folks, and YES, it is worth every effort growing them Health and Survival food plants.
      One can never end enjoying it, specially with few handy acres around :D.
      GO AHEAD FOLKS, my place took an RADICAL transformation this year..
      Almost every morning, am sitting in my back yard under the lemon shading tree with my 2 cups of coffee and plan how to utilise every centimetre of space with all my new variety of plants…Shade house for breeding Yabies and growing 2 Tamarilo fruit trees is on the plans also….OI MOI OI VEI ..lol 😀
      Cheers

      September 17, 2013 at 12:45 am

      • I know that Tamarillo’s grow here in Tassie as I found 2 on the side of the road a few years ago (reminds me…they are still in the freezer awaiting planting out 😉 ). They suffer from frost but to be honest, we don’t get a lot of frost here on Serendipity Farm. I need a lemon but if it suffers like the 2 mandarin trees have at the hands of the possums I am going to have to protect it to the max!

        September 17, 2013 at 5:56 am

  2. Looks like the Serendipity Farm is an fun place to be …..Good Luck 😀

    September 17, 2013 at 6:28 am

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s