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Nerium ~ Oleander Plant Care Guide

Oleander

Pink Oleander

An attractive evergreen shrub for warm climates, oleander produces heavily scented, colorful flowers all summer and fall. (warning ~ this plant is poisonous)

About This Plant

Oleanders bloom from summer to fall, with fragrant flowers in shades of apricot, copper, pink, lilac, red, purple, salmon, yellow, and white, depending on variety. The plants are best adapted to the west coast, southern states, Florida, and Texas and will withstand dry conditions and wind, as well as salty, marshy soils, making them popular in coastal regions. Oleanders grow 6 to 12 feet tall and wide, and some varieties can be trained to grow into small trees up to 20 feet tall. The flowers are very fragrant. All parts of plant are poisonous to humans and animals if ingested; the plant’s sap can cause skin irritation in some individuals.

Special Features

Fragrant

Site Selection

Ideally, select a site with full sun to light shade and well-drained soil. However, oleanders are adaptable and will withstand dry conditions as well as marshy soils.

Planting Instructions

Plant in spring or fall. Space plants 6 to 12 feet apart, depending on variety. Dig a hole only as deep as the root ball and 2 to 3 times as wide. If your soil is in very poor condition, amend the soil you’ve removed from the hole with a small amount of compost. Otherwise don’t amend it at all. Carefully remove the plant from the container and set it in the hole. Fill the hole half full with soil, then water it well to settle the soil and eliminate air pockets. Let the water drain, then fill the remainder of hole with soil and water thoroughly.

Care

Apply a layer of compost under the plant each spring, spreading it out to the dripline (the area under the outermost branches). Add a 2-inch layer of mulch to retain moisture and control weeds. Water plants during the summer if rainfall is less than 1 inch per week. Prune oleander after the main bloom period to encourage bushier growth and more flowers, and to reduce the size of the shrub.
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See also….
 

 

Oleander Care: Tips For Growing Oleanders In The Garden

Caring for an Oleander Tree

Problems With Oleander Plants

 

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8 responses

  1. Nice bushes, very hardy, but full of poison….DEADLY to Horses

    June 28, 2013 at 2:08 am

    • yeah pretty lethal, when was researching people have also been poisoned from it. fair warning and put in beginning of post it was poisonous. they are called freeway plants so they have to be easy growers.

      am looking for some shrubs besides lilacs to make privacy fence out of, but it won’t be these sadly with the kids and critters.

      June 28, 2013 at 2:11 am

      • Lilacs are great border bushes…Dig some of the runners and transplant them in line ….Yes I know, different colors would look better.

        June 28, 2013 at 2:17 am

      • probably will stick with lilacs i love the scent, and want to do some kind of “play area” for kids covered in wisteria 🙂

        June 28, 2013 at 2:19 am

  2. Oh, wisteria is nice but runners will go even under the house if too close.
    Must be under control …And if go for color, plant WHITE WISTERIA , very tasty flowers for a snack not strong flavor and not too poisonous I EAT EVERY TIME I GET MY HANDS ON WHITE WISTERIA ..lol

    June 28, 2013 at 2:25 am

    • thank you for tips 🙂 i thought would be nice shaded area for the babies

      June 28, 2013 at 2:35 am

      • Don’t take me wrong, it is beautiful, but plant it away from house.
        Tip…Take 3 or 4 RUNNERS, TWIST THEM UP LIKE A HORSE PONY TAIL, and TIED UP TO A STEEL POST 2 or 3 Mtr TALL IN THE GROUND ….IN FEW YEARS, YOU WILL HAVE A TWISTED TREE LIKE LOOKING, WITH A NICE SHADING ROUND CROWN ….;)

        June 28, 2013 at 2:46 am

      • sweet thank you 🙂

        June 28, 2013 at 2:51 am

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